Join Andrei and our guest on today’s episode, Elzie Flenard III, as they will be discussing podcasts, as part of a comprehensive content marketing strategy, as well as tips and strategies to run a professional podcast show. Elzie is the CEO of Podcast Town, the podcasting agency through which he helps people and brands connect, communicate and cultivate relationships with their audience through podcasting, coaching and training.

Connect with Elzie: 

Website:  https://www.podcasttown.net/about-us 

Elzie on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elziedflenardiii/ 

 

Connect with Andrei:

Marketiu: https://marketiu.com / https://marketiu.ro  

Andrei on Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreitiu/ 

Marketiu on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketiu 

Marketiu on Twitter: https://twitter.com/marketiuagency 

Marketiu on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marketiuagency/ 

Email at hello@marketiu.ro

 

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Episode transcript:

Andrei Tiu  

Hi there! This is Andrei and you are on The Marketing Innovation Podcast Show. Our special guest today is Elzie, or, as many know him, ”The Mayor”. He is the CEO of Podcast Town, the podcasting agency through which he helps people and brands connect, communicate and cultivate relationships with their audience through podcasting, coaching and training. Today, we'll discuss podcasts as part of a comprehensive content marketing strategy, as well as tips and strategies to run a professional podcast show. So without further ado, Elzie it's a pleasure to have you here on the show. How are you? How's the morning / almost lunchtime going?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Well, first of all, Andrei, thank you so much for having me on the show. I am doing fantastic. It is around 11am. Almost lunchtime here in the US. So I'm excited and full of energy and ready to talk about podcasting.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Love it, super. So let's go! We have a very curious audience here. I know that podcasting has been, you know, on the marketers mind for five years now and things are moving forward in many cases. But I think the way that we will approach the subject today is going to be super relevant and super interesting. I'm excited to get to it. However, I would like to start by letting you tell us a bit about you and about your journey and how you started on this path. Are you up for it?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Let's do it.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Super, over to you.

 

Elzie Flenard  

So my journey started, pretty much by accident in terms of how I got into podcasting. I'll spare you the long version of the story, but essentially, I was looking to learn, and I was stuck in my side hustle and I wanted to quit my day job. But I didn't have the knowledge, I felt I needed to know more about business and how to run business in order to get over that hump. And so my bright idea was I was going to start this show called ”Enterprise Now” and I was going to invite these brilliant business minds onto my show and learn from them. And so that's what I did, I started my show, I started learning so many concepts and principles from these business owners that eventually, it worked! I was able to quit my day job and do podcasting full time. So that's the long and short story, but it was totally not my intention to start a podcast business, it just sort of happened.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay, so you initially just wanted to be a podcaster?

 

Elzie Flenard  

I wanted to do anything other than my day job, quite honestly. I'm a business guy, I love entrepreneurship, solving problems, and helping people get to the next level in their business and in their lives. And so I really saw an opportunity in the podcast space that it was growing, that the on demand culture was increasing. And this still continues to do so. And so it was kind of a timing thing where the problem presented itself at the right time. I had the skill set, and I jumped in both feet.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very nice. Can I ask what was the job that you were hating before?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Oh, all of them. I've never had a job I liked, Andrei, like ever. I've had jobs that I could deal with, they were okay. But I've never had a job that I loved, until now, of course.

 

Andrei Tiu  

That's very cool that you managed to, you know, find your place here. So how long was the period of time when you were hating your jobs? And when did the switch happen?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yes, so I've worked since I was 15 years old, Andrei. And I'm 39 now. So quite a long time, I probably worked my side gig in my adult career for about 15 years before I was able to make that transition. And, quite frankly, it was scary, you know, you're going from, and at the time I was making six figures, so it wasn't like I was making a job that I couldn't pay the bills with. Financially, I was doing all right, you know, and so, I made the transition and I could say I wish, in some ways I wish I had done it earlier, but in some ways I'm glad it happened when it did because I learned so much from how larger  corporations operate that helped me in my business now.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Sweet. So just for our audience to know in terms of the timeframes. How long have you been having this business and when did you actually move to being a full time podcast guy?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yes. So my business started in 2011. So I think, if I'm doing the math, 10 years ago, and I've been running Podcast Town for about four and a half years.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Nice. So you're still a bit of an early adopter in that sense. Because in 2015 - 16, there were a few, but there were not too many podcasts.

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yeah, it's interesting, because podcasting has been around for quite a while. But  there'll be these ebbs and flows in popularity. When I started, not a tonne of people have podcasts. Now, that's not the case, a lot of people have podcasts now. And so, it's really cool to see the industry sort of grow and become an actual industry with an infrastructure and in some ways, rules and things like that. So it's been a pretty cool thing to watch.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay, so then, so that we can drift easily into the actual, you know, tactical side of the discussion. What's your day looking like right now, what are you doing?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Okay, so my day includes I did a little bit of bookkeeping this morning, onboarding a new client. I'm here now doing this podcast interview. So that's content creation / marketing / relationship building. Later today, I have to prepare for a webinar that we're doing in a little bit. And then I have to move to my to do list, looking at my operations to make sure that that's efficient. There's a platform that I'm thinking about switching over to. So right there, I've done let's see marketing and sales, I've done operations, I've done finance. Did I leave anything out of the four major areas of business? It's a mix of a lot of different things.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay, but your main activity now has to do with your agency and with working with people to have successful podcasts, right? So now let's put on the marketing / business hat. And let's look at this through, what I think would be our audience's eyes when we approach the subject of content marketing / podcasting. I think we can start with defining how a podcast can help a business and how we could bring value to a content marketing strategy. And here we have two angles through which you can integrate podcasts into a content marketing strategy: One of them is as a company or as an individual that wants to be the personal brand, to have your own podcast and to invite people and to associate yourself with these names and you know, sort of building on what you need in that direction, and create content on the way. Or you can look at being present on more podcasts so that you can, again, be the thought leader to say so by being invited to all these shows and stuff. And now, what are your thoughts on this? Or how do you approach this angle with your clients? How do you feel that podcasts can be best integrated into this content marketing framework?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Well to answer your question, the three things that I always think about whether you're guesting on a show, or you're hosting a show, is building relationships, growing your influence, and building authority. Those are the three things that whether it's a personal brand, if it's a corporate brand, you're going to want to do those things, right? You're going to want to build relationships, you want to raise your profile or your authority, and you want influence because those are the things that are going to segue into building your know like trust factor, which is the ground level. That's why people do business with people they like know and trust, right? So I'll start there, but I think, on a drill down level, you really have to understand who you want to talk to. I think if you're in business, the fact that you need a podcast, that's a foregone conclusion. You need to be in the podcast space. I mean that's, to me, my opinion, that's not even an option anymore. If you're not in a space, you're already falling behind. So let's just get that out of there. So, Mr. / Mrs. business owner, if you're listening to this podcast, The Mayor has declared that you need to be in the podcast space. Now, how you show up in the space varies depending on what your goals are, what your brain is, right? So not everybody should host a branded show. But you should at least be guesting on shows. Why? Multiplication. You get to take advantage of somebody else's, we just mentioned, they've already built the relationships with their audience, they've already established trust and authority, they already have influence. And so you get to borrow that, and cheat the system, so to speak, by being a guest on their show, giving a massive value to the listeners. And that's a cheat code. So, if you're not guesting on podcast and taking advantage of that, what are you doing? Secondly, I would say that, hearing your voice hearing, even as I'm listening to my own voice, there's something that happens to us psychologically, when we hear voices, when we hear audio, that is different from written, and is different from video. To have your brand's voice, literally, in between somebody's ears, is a very, very impactful way to present to them your message, why you exist, and how you can help them.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very good point there. Okay, and, having that in mind, and knowing that this should be sort of like the discussion not if you should, or should not be on the show, but rather, what appearance should you have there. Let's say there is a business and they are sort of not anymore, a startup, they have a presence, and they have a marketing team. And they are considering podcasts, willing to take some action. Do you have a strategy with the clients that you work with are the moments to decide the direction in which they should go, like, for example, if they feel they would like to be starring on podcasts, they need to do this and they need to think about it this way, while as if they want to have a podcast show, then deciding on the content strategy that they want to build, depending on niche and everything.

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yeah, I always start with the end in mind. Every brand is different, every company is different, every company has a different internal resources and goal. Right? So if a company comes to me, and they say, well, Elzie, we want to leverage podcasting. My next question would be "for what?" What is the action? What is the end result of what you want to happen from your podcast? For some brands, it might be, we want people to just be aware of our brain and what we do who we are and why we do it. Our approach is completely different than if you say: "Well, no, we want to drive revenue with our podcast", what we do, how we do it, and why we do it is going to be different in that case. Or you might say: "well, I just want an internal podcast so that we can hammer in our mission, vision, core values to our internal employees." Again, we're going to approach it differently with that goal in mind. So I would say the first step is understanding what action you want to drive with your podcast. And then tailoring literally everything else to that. Everything from your segments, to how long the podcast is, your artwork, your show notes, the website, everything is going to be built based on what your end goal is.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Cool, very good answer. And to build on top of what you just mentioned, because we just had this discussion with two of our clients and I think it's good to put it out there for everybody that is considering this, is when you think about the podcast, and you decide whether you like to be a guest or you want to have your own podcast, I think it's very important to bear in mind your content marketing strategy as a whole, integrated, as a company. Because what you ideally want to do is to use this on your channel that you haven't necessarily tapped into before, so that you can drive sort of the same message at the same time, in line with your other communications. So as you were mentioning there and pointing out, this is your opportunity to put a voice to your brand. So if you do that, at least have a coherent message and be sure that the efforts that you do on one side are not going to be necessarily duplicated, but you're sort of following the same direction and everything is congruent from a brand messaging perspective.

 

Elzie Flenard  

Absolutely.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay, so now let's look at content marketing and content repurposing and refurbishing. When you work out your clients strategy for deploying or lounging podcast, First of all, do you have a launch blueprint that you could share maybe a bit of, for our audience here to understand what are some points that they should be considering, if they decide to go down this route?

 

Elzie Flenard  

I think, in terms of blueprint, it kind of goes back to my earlier answer, right? It kind of depends on the show what our goals are, but higher level, right? You want to look at things like your target market: Who are we talking to? What's our message? And again, that'll inform things like the title, your show notes format, what artwork, what colours are we going to use, right? Because a lot of people don't understand the psychological impact of colours. So depending on who your target audience is, you might want to add those colours into your artwork. So looking at that, looking at what is the format of the show. If you're trying to reach TikTokers, maybe you don't want to have a two hour long podcast, because they probably won't want to listen to a two hour podcast, they are TikTokers, they like short, meaty, or funny or entertaining clips. So again, just stepping through all of those things, title, market, basically putting together a creative brief of the show, so that everybody's on the same page, to your point, reviewing the organization's mission, vision, values to make sure that there's congruency and alignment there and really just understanding the approach. Is it every other week? Is it weekly? Are we going to do a daily show three times a week? So just really getting intentional about all those details.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very cool. Would you be up to discuss maybe some podcasts lounge case studies, and then, you know, we can have a conversation there. I'm happy to be open with our strategy as well with the podcast that we are doing right now. So people that have been with us from the beginning, they probably noticed some changes as we went through the seasons and episodes. And maybe we can have an open discussion. Maybe it helps people that are debating where to start, or how to think about their own strategy. I can start just so I don't throw you under the bus. And then you can take over and we can, you know, debate certain decisions or ideas. Sounds good?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Sounds like a plan.

 

Andrei Tiu  

So basically, the story in this podcast is that we launched it in 2018. And we kept it up for a while, and then we just didn't have enough time to record anymore. So we left it there for a while, and then we decided last year in spring that we want to restart on it, because we've been out of this space for a very long while. And as you mentioned, in terms of the sort of voice channel, we didn't do much activity here. So we had graphics, we had a lot of content marketing in the form of written content, but not so much audio, and we want to generate more content that can be then repurposed. We also felt running the podcast would be a nice tool to be able to give back to our community of subscribers and to our community of "marketing leaders", in this sense, by inviting people that have more specialised knowledge from other areas of the world. So at the moment, we operate a lot in the UK and Western Europe, as well as Romania, in Europe. So we felt that, you know, helping people understand how things are going in the US or Australia or even Europe, but certain countries would be very relevant to building that knowledge base, and to complement the know-how. And it's also easier to consume audio, and more nice, you know, in that sense. So we launched and we were running weekly episodes, probably until this spring, so for about a year, and how we thought about the podcast, and we had some changes here on strategy. First of all, we wanted to produce a blog post of each episode. So we had the transcript. And then we also wanted to tap into the SEO benefit. So most of the episodes as we are discussing now, for example, you know, our discussion is on podcast marketing, and you know, content marketing, we would use this to create internal links and backlinks from certain platforms and essentially build on top of our SEO while also helping our guests platforms so we would backlink to them, and we use our platforms to create backlinks to them as well. So from an SEO Marketing point of view, that was beneficial for everybody. And then we use insights to create knowledge nuggets, to say so, so, you know, very little pieces of information that could be integrated into visual or more recently, we have started to use extracts from episodes on our TikTok channel. Making it easy to consume, but having a big chunk of content that we can then split and use across channels. And this has worked very well, but as you can imagine, it was a lot of time that we had to go into each episode, probably about 20 something hours. So with editing and producing everything, we decided to not have weekly episodes for this upcoming season and the last so we are running it twice a month and this gives us also a lot more time to promote and to get every episode to a larger audience, so we are kind of changing direction as we go. And as we feel, it would contribute best to our audience, as well as our business / marketing plan, to say so, and this was in short. How about some of the podcasts that you have been involved in, some nice stories that you felt were particularly relevant? Or some shows that capture your attention recently? What made them special?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Well, I can give you 2. So, everything you said was great. Yeah, same, we try to, again, when we're going through though, that the strategy and the angle, that sort of determines how much of the repurposing we do, where it comes from that type of thing. But naturally, the anchor content is the audio, so I have some clients where we'll do an article based on the content, and then we'll do a blog post, and then we'll do snippets.  So we'll do a number of, depending on their level of service, of repurposing from the audio, because again, we want to capture the voice and the message of the client and the brand from that audio. But a couple quick ones that I can think of offhand in terms of case studies is I have a client and they're coaches. And we basically designed her show to drive traffic to her coaching clinics. So when you listen to the show, it sounds like they do role play, there's some fun in there, and it really feels like you are going to one of their clinics, and we have doubled their clinical attendance. Because when people listen to the show, they get a sense of what it would be like to work with them. And so again, when people subscribe, they know and trust, they go to the website, they already know what it feels like to work with them what it might be like, and so they sign up, right? So that's what I mean, in terms of looking at the angle and then working our way backwards. For them, maybe we don't need all the extra repurposing stuff. Maybe we do, maybe we add it in gradually as the show progresses to even deepen the relationships and put gasoline on the fire. So again, it's always looking at the goal and then working backwards, right? So there might be a time where we look at it and say - Okay, well, we're getting good traction with the clinics, let's add a blog post to this, let's add an article, let's add some TikTok videos, or, whatever the case is. So again, our strategy is always looking at what our goal is, and what pieces of content Do we need to draw out of that anchor content, that is going to move people to the action that we want them to take. Another example is, I'm a musician, I'm a singer / songwriter.

 

Andrei Tiu  

I'm a guitarist.

 

Elzie Flenard  

And so my strategy is I'm going to launch a podcast and I'm going to take people on my journey on why I wrote the songs, what they mean to me, where they came from, what was my inspiration? And then on the business side, how much does this cost? How long did it take and all the details about this music, and that's my promotion strategy. I want to take people on a journey and then have the release in the podcast. And so the, you know, the jury's out. I don't know if it'll work or not, but that's my strategy. Is to really the develop that relationship with listeners, before the music even comes out so that when it comes out, we've gone on that journey together.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very cool. Okay, can we zoom into music a bit? Because it's also one of my biggest passions. And I'm very curious, and I think it's gonna be very relevant to our discussion here in the broader context. Soyou have identified that podcasting will be a very nice innovative way, in a way, to promote and launch your music. What are the strategies to promote it that you have in mind to grow the audience from basically zero in the beginning, since it's a new one, to whatever, if you have a goal what's the goal? And what are the tactics that you are looking to deploy? To get there in a short amount of time?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yes, so my goal is to get, I want to get 300 people on my email list. That is, that's my goal. And the idea is that I want those 300 people to share it with three people. Right. And so if my math is right, let me let me just get my calculator here. So if those 300 people, share it with three people, then I'll be at 900. So my goal is to get 1000 people on the email list. And then when I launch, I want to be on 1000 people's Spotify playlists, though, that those are my two main goals. My strategy to get there is, I'm starting with my personal Facebook, because I think a lot of the people, at least those foundational people, that's where they're hanging out. And from there, I'm going to start teasing it. And then once I launched the podcast, my only call to action is going to be, number one, share it with somebody that you think is also interested in this journey and I want you to put me on your Spotify playlist. So that is the action that I want the people to take. And so the journey is, I'm gonna I'm going to be sharing how I wrote the song, like, the inspiration and all that stuff. Starting with Facebook, I probably run some Facebook ads just to kind of raise brand awareness around what I'm doing, and why. But I really want the groundswell of people who who follow me, who want to hear the music, then  sharing with other people. So my strategy is simple. I want to gorilla marketing, share it with your friends. Starting with Facebook, we might look at TikTok, but primarily on Facebook.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Nice. And in terms of building up that email list. Are you going to create a subscription landing page that is different from your podcasts to subscribe them to your podcast? Or how is that going to work?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yes, so I'll have a landing page, a squeeze page with a nice video on it saying, Hey, I'm Elzie bla bla bla, here's what I'm doing, here's what I want you to do, again, driving those same actions, if you if you're interested in the journey, sign up below, and share this with somebody that you think would also be interested in the journey. So there's two songs, so the songs will be at some point on that squeeze page so that they can download them for free. Or once they come out, or they can put a shareable link on there where they can share it to their friend right from that squeeze page. And then again, once the the songs come out, they'll be on that same squeeze page.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very cool. Best of luck. This is gonna be exciting. One quick tip here, that might actually help you in getting boosted by Spotify and getting into those new commerce playlists would be if you can ask them to pre save your tracks. So from your artists account, if you can have them available to pre save, then pre saving them is going to help you when you do launch, get positioned a bit above. And depending on how you split it when you know when you have to choose the categories and everything. You might actually be able to get into some targeted categories.

 

Elzie Flenard  

Ah, well, thanks. Thanks for that tip. I will implement that.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, this could actually make a difference. And because you mentioned Spotify ads, depending on the budget, but, sorry, you mentioned the Facebook ads, but depending on the budget, if you want to get Spotify listens, you might be better off with Spotify ads, and they tend to be less expensive as well. So, specifically targeting music fans. The only thing that they are the only thing that you need to keep in mind though, is the only people that receive Spotify ads are people that don't pay for subscriptions. So you know you'd probably get to probably the younger audience. What's the music music, by the way, what genre?

 

Elzie Flenard  

It is worship music, so it's Christian worship.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay. I mean, you can at least have a look, see if it's something that you think would be like a channel that you think would work well. And, you know, from there, you can select specific artists that would be relevant to your style, and then you can target the audience of those artists. And this is very targeted. This could be a nice opportunity as well.

 

Elzie Flenard  

Cool, thank you. I'll take those things into consideration. Appreciate it.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah. Grace off. No worries, best of luck. Okay, and now let's go back to our podcasting session. Okay, cool. So where did we leave it in case studies, right? Both of them are nice angles to actually think a bit outside of the box and bring your brand to life better through, you know, an additional channel. And the question that I think is on many people's minds is how and when do you start to monetize? When do you know it's a good time? And what are the opportunities to monetize?

 

Elzie Flenard  

That is the million dollar question, right? Everybody wants to know, how do I make money with this thing? And kind of building off of the music discussion? I think if podcasters start to think about things similarly to music, we wouldn't be better off, for example, how much, how do you monetize music? Right? And then when I posed that question to people that I get this look like - "Well, what do you mean?" - because years ago, people actually bought music, they would, you know, I told you, I'm 39. So when I was younger, you will go to the store and they have these things called CDs, compact discs, with music on them, you would grab it, you will pick it up, it was a physical thing, you would take it to the register, and you would buy it and you will take it home and listen to it. People don't do that anymore. For the most part, now they stream it. You know, I can't tell you the last time I purchased music, it's been many, many years. And so making money from music is very difficult. And it's different now. I would say the same thing with podcasts. People never pay for podcasts, right? You never could go to a store and grab it off the shelf and purchase it. But what you want to monetize is, again, the relationships that you have built. What that looks like, practically is, for example, if you're a coach, you want to leverage that, like no trust factor, the relationship, the authority, the influence, to sell a course, or maybe it's an event, or maybe it's a product or service. That return on investment is a lot higher than selling sponsorship or ads, because for a reason that is unknown to me, the cost per 1000s is so low, that you have to have a lot of downloads for it to make sense for it to make it worth it. My opinion, right? So you have 10,000 downloads, that's 10 units times 335, that's $350. That's not a lot for the time that it's going to take you to present your podcast, your audience, your reach to a sponsor, sign the contract and do all the stuff that it takes to get a sponsor. My opinion, it's much higher return on investment for you to sell the service, sell a product that you have, than it is to go the ads route. So to answer your question, how do you monetize a podcast? is you really have to look at it as a holistic brand and how do you monetize the brand outside of just looking at the podcast? How many people do you have on your email list? How many people are coming to your website? Are people clicking on the links in your show notes? When you send an email, how many people are opening it? What's your open rate? Those types of things are all added value to monetizing your show. So if you're looking at sponsorship, make sure you include again, your email list, your web traffic, all of those things, how many likes and views and shares do you get when you post something on Facebook? That is a value add to a sponsor. So you really want to look at the podcast brand holistically, and what value it's bringing and then base your sponsorship on that and not just your downloads. But even with that Your own practical services the return on investment tends to be higher.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Right. So basically what we do here that we are running to agencies, and we do have podcasts, and we do this thing is basically just like a sort of giving it a marketing channel approach, rather than the revenue generating thing that we do would be, you know, for us now, but thinking in context of everybody would be of better value than trying to make it a revenue generating engine by itself. Right? And I think this can be valid and nice add on points to our discussion a bit earlier, when we were talking about how you should approach a podcast? Or if you want to have a podcast? What subjects Do you want to have on it, and you know, sort of proving value in this way, rather than by how much money you make off each 10k listens, as you mentioned? This was a nice insight. Right? So what do you cook these days, Elzie? What are we up to? What's exciting you?

 

Elzie Flenard  

For me, what's exciting me is just continuing to grow the agency. You know, we've been around a little bit now, in podcast years, and now it's just a matter of really refining our processes, our services that we offer, and being creative on how we get our clients results. And really just growing and, and impacting the world through audio, I'm a really big fan of the audio medium, right? Right now I'm spending most of my time in podcasting, but speaking, and music, and podcasting are all things that, you know, I have passions in and so I'm really excited about where audio is going as a marketing channel, and our little slice of the pie and saying that whole industry take off.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Nice. And in terms of the clients that you work with, I know you offer sort of like a 360 offering or pallet of services from, you know, having the production rooms to, as we mentioned now a bit of the strategy. I mean, the strategy element of the podcast, and everything has to do with this. You know, if anybody here on the show would like to have a conversation with you and see maybe store something together? Are you localised in your area? Or what type of clients do you work with typically?

 

Elzie Flenard  

My clients are all over. We don't have any international clients yet. But I mean, that would be great to work with people from other parts of the globe. But what we do is for the most part, we can do it virtually so we have clients in LA, New York and all over the US. So naturally, the studio itself, you kind of have to be local. But yeah, all the other services we can provide remotely. So yeah, I'd love to, to have a quick chat with anybody who has more questions or want to wants to just say hi,

 

Andrei Tiu  

Super. Okay, so we'll have links to your platforms in the description of the episode and everywhere, so people can connect with you directly. And just for the record, so because we have quite a few people that are joining from the US, and literally from everywhere on the globe, apart from, we don't have enough or not so many in Asia. But other than that, we are pretty international with the show. As it stands, where are you located? Just so people know.

 

Elzie Flenard  

We are in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, home of the world champion Milwaukee Bucks.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Nice. Okay. Elzie, this was a very big pleasure to spend this evening here with you. Very nice insights. And, you know, really appreciate your openness to all the subjects that we've been through. If there's anything else that you'd like to share with the audience, before we wrap up?

 

Elzie Flenard  

Yes, the only thing I want to share is, if you're listening to or watching this podcast, and you are in business, and you are not in the podcast space in some form, get in the space. Whether you're hosting a show, guesting on shows or sponsoring a show, you need to be in the podcast space, audio is going to continue to grow. And people want to hear from you, they want to hear your brand voice, So get in the game.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Cool, guys, thank you again for tuning in today. Hope you enjoyed our topics here looking forward to hearing your feedback. And you know any questions that you might have directly to Elzie you'd have his contact details in the description of this episode or directly to us. And if it's something that we can do to maybe you know, complement the insights that we brought to the table today, or maybe even organise something for the future in a more focused area of podcasting, then definitely let us know. And make sure you take this as homework and look into the way in which you can start to be present in the podcasting world. Seriously now, I mean this is definitely a space where you should be active as a brand and it's a lot of opportunity here. But Elzie Until next time this was a big pleasure wishing you the very best of success have a rockin good autumn and best of luck with your album. Hit us up as well when it's out or when you are pre launching it. So we can save that to our Spotify playlist soon.

 

Elzie Flenard  

I sure will, thank you so much for having me!

 

Andrei Tiu  

Thank you too! have a nice rest of the day!

 

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