Join Andrei and our guest, James Scherer, on today’s episode, as they will dive deep into content marketing trends for 2022. From strategy shifts to AI and SEO drove content production. James is the VP of Growth at Codeless. He's helped 10 figure brands like monday.com or Nextiva dominate categories with content marketing at a massive scale.

 

𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐬:  

𝑊𝑒𝑏𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑒: codeless.io

𝐽𝑎𝑚𝑒𝑠 𝑜𝑛 𝐿𝑖𝑛𝑘𝑒𝑑𝐼𝑛: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-scherer-94709830/

𝐽𝑎𝑚𝑒𝑠 𝑜𝑛 𝑇𝑤𝑖𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑟: @JDScherer 

 

𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐀𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐢:

𝑀𝑎𝑟𝑘𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑢: https://marketiu.com  / https://marketiu.ro   

𝐴𝑛𝑑𝑟𝑒𝑖 𝑜𝑛 𝐿𝑖𝑛𝑘𝑒𝑑𝑖𝑛: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreitiu/   

𝑀𝑎𝑟𝑘𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑢 𝑜𝑛 𝐿𝑖𝑛𝑘𝑒𝑑𝑖𝑛: https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketiu   

𝑀𝑎𝑟𝑘𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑢 𝑜𝑛 𝑇𝑤𝑖𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑟: https://twitter.com/marketiuagency   

𝑀𝑎𝑟𝑘𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑢 𝑜𝑛 𝐼𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑚: https://www.instagram.com/marketiuagency/  

𝐸𝑚𝑎𝑖𝑙 𝑎𝑡 hello@marketiu.ro

 

𝐋𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐩𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐝𝐞 𝐨𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦:

▶️Watch the episode on YouTube: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-YouTube 

▶️ Apple Podcasts: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show 

▶️ Podbean: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-Podbean 

▶️ Spotify: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-Spotify 

▶️ Deezer: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-Deezer 

▶️ Stitcher: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-Stitcher 

▶️ Castbox: https://bit.ly/The-Marketing-Innovation-Show-Castbox 

 

Useful links:

Monday.com: https://monday.com/ 

MarketingMuse: https://www.marketmuse.com/ 

Clearscope: https://www.clearscope.io/ 

 

Episode transcript:

 

Andrei Tiu  

Hi, there! This is Andrei, and you are on The Marketing Innovation Podcast Show. Our special guest today is James Scherer, VP of growth at Codeless. He's helped 10 figure brands like monday.com or Nextiva dominate categories with content marketing at a massive scale. And today we'll dive deep into content marketing trends for 2022. From strategy shifts to AI and SEO drove content production. Exciting times, a very insightful and practical discussion today. James, it's a pleasure to have you here on the show! How are you? How's it going?

 

James Scherer  

It's going very well. Thank you for having me. I'm excited about this.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, same here. Thank you for being on the show. Let's see. So without further ado, let's bring a bit of your background to the table. So I'd like for you to maybe make a quick intro. Let people get to know you a little bit. Tell us how you started in marketing. What was your journey so far? Maybe a couple of highlights. And then we have some really interesting case studies that we were discussing just before the show, so I'm really excited to get into them and talk a bit about, you know, hands-on marketing.

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, absolutely. Okay, so a bit about me. My name is James Scherer. I'm currently the VP of growth at Codeless, which is a Content Marketing agency. I started marketing in 2013, I was an English graduate. And when I graduated, like a lot of liberal arts majors, I didn't really know exactly what I was going to do. And I fell into Content Marketing and writing totally haphazardly at a startup in Vancouver, Canada, where I was living, and really, really enjoyed it and suddenly had something to do with my degree, which was handy. And I moved from writer at a startup there to editor and then Head of Inbound. So when I left in 2018, that was kind of my role. And that was, you know, a lot of really good foundational understanding of digital marketing because I was writing on a lot of different digital marketing subjects because our agency or the company I worked for, did a broad spectrum of stuff. And then I went kind of remote, my wife and I started travelling the world a little bit. So I was writing. And I, again, kind of fell into writing for this content marketing agency. And then when I kind of settled back down here in the UK with my wife, back in 2019, I moved to Director of an editorial at Codeless. And then just in January, a VP of Growth. So my role here is really kind of revolves around. Initially, it was managing the editorial staff and the writers. And now it's more our internal growth, as well as kind of the strategies that we add on behalf of our clients. And we make recommendations to our clients and how they can grow through contact content and inbound. So that's me.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Fun time. Okay, so you started off with a sort of written content marketing type of activity, and then expanded and grew from there. And during your time when you were the head of inbound, were you guys doing mostly organic stuff Or were you also coordinating the paid channels such as you know, Google Ads or other types of paid acquisition?

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, so I was primarily focused on the organic side of things, though, I was pretty involved in the conversion optimization as well with the site, which kind of did touch on. We had a paid team, who we coordinated with for sure, just to like Target the SERPs they were targeting and vice versa, and then not targeting the SERPs they were targeting. But it was primarily my focus that has always been around inbound organic traffic, leads and sales.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Very cool. Okay, sweet. So, you know, I just can't be patient anymore. I want to go into the numbers because I'm really excited to talk - about it's probably one of the most or more popular case studies that you have been leading on and that you guys have been working on. And that is monday.com. So we all know as marketers, everybody probably saw ads from them or got visibility towards their brands in the past two or three years massively. And I know that you guys were behind their organic success. And more specifically, you were driving the activity there. So it'd be really exciting and interesting for us to bring as much as you can to the table from that case study. And then maybe we can bounce some ideas and make a little analysis on what made this case study be so successful? And also, what can our listeners take away from it to implement or to look at when they're planning their content strategy for this year?

 

James Scherer  

Absolutely. And you are absolutely right, that we all saw monday.com. I think they retargeted us - all of us - in 2021. I wouldn't be surprised. Yeah. So they came on with us in October of 2020, fall of 2020. And they very quickly wanted to do the massive volume of content. They had been in kind of the market for multiple content marketing agencies. And when we kind of started talking to them and said, like, hey, we could do double of what you want to be doing. In which they wanted to do 75 pieces in the first month. And down to the kind of like 75 to 50, in like the third, fourth, fifth sixth. So, in the first 12 months of working with them, we did about 400 pieces of content, which was, you know, massive volume. So coordinating the right key phrases for us to target and then determining, like, everything that we needed to form an outline creation stage for all of our writers to come in. We had like 35 writers on their account one time. That was all a bit, you know, it was a lot to do. But it was really exciting, of course, because you know, monday.com is one of those Unicorns of the tech space. So, as I said, Yeah, I think 425 Odd pieces were created in the first year,

 

Andrei Tiu  

Was this on-site and off-site or just for on-site?

 

James Scherer  

On-site exclusively. Everything they did was on site. Yeah, so, 425 ranking positions, out of 800 articles. So 750 articles in the first nine months, and then 800 by the end of the year, because they slow down. And I think more than half of those returned 350 of them breaking the first page for the private for the primary key phrase. So massive results, I think a total of like 23,000 new organic key phrases from those articles exclusively. And 825 first page rankings across the board. So yeah, so if 350 odd for the target keyphrase, and then 801st-page rankings for all the articles. So huge results for them. And it was really, really exciting to work with them and do it. And we're actually doing another 93 before the end of February for them. And that's just starting this week. So I am enthusiastic about being on this podcast, but I need to go help.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yes, it sounds very busy. So can we talk a bit about the strategy behind it? Because this is something that we discuss with our clients as an agency as well. And it's always a debating point, like how much should you write? How much is enough? How much is the minimum necessary? What was the strategy that you went for when working with them? And also what determined them to go all-in on the on-site only content production, as well as the very high volume? Were you optimising articles one per keyword and had a very long list? Were you targeting phrases with more articles at once, or what was basically what informed your strategy together and this case study?

 

James Scherer  

It's a big question. And it's a sort of, it'll be a big, big answer. So bear with me. The answer to the question of okay, let me sort of a bit of context. Monday.com has a massive marketing budget. They're a massive company, and they needed significant investment in inbound or in the creation of blog content, in order to compete with, you know, significant competitors really sizable competitors. They also wanted to break into the CMS spacers they weren't currently in as much as they wanted to be. They wanted to have an entire section on templates was of content which it didn't have its time. Let alone the fact that a lot of primary topics like the key phrase project match marketing software. They did not have content. So the answer to how much content should your listeners be producing, cannot be answered by what Monday did. Monday did the higher volume of content, 75 pieces per month of act 2000 words. Which is above and beyond what most businesses can possibly imagine doing, their marketing budget is significant. I think what we should discuss perhaps are the takeaways that like, quote-unquote, normal businesses can actually like learn from what we did with them. So the first step to identify the key phrases that they targeted was to structure everything around categories, which is how I do it with all of our clients and market size. What are the categories of content that your business wants to be found for? A lot of people business, like, think about SEO strategy around like what do I want to be found for when somebody types into Google what I want to shop for? Which is an approach for me, it's more what? What do you want to talk about? What do you want to talk about, in general, if you're a project management tool, like Monday, then it's Yeah, project management? But it's also productivity. It's also teamwork. It's also in their case, CMS is also like sales funnel optimization, because they were doing a lot of like, they added a lead form product. So it's okay, if these are the five categories of content we want to produce let's prioritise search terms within each of those categories. The priority process for them was a little bit more in-depth than I tend to go for, they included the kind of value from a paid perspective, into kind of the algorithm that they use to spit out a priority, a numbered priority for each topic. So for instance, project management software is a bottom of funnel key phrase, because it has the word software in it, they offer software. So that's people who search for that are only interested in the buying process, essentially, they want to learn what's out there and choose one of them. They're not looking to really know what project management is. So yeah, they kind of took those key phrases and ran them through this algorithm based on like, Okay, what is the volume of this key phrase that makes it like a high volume search term makes it a priority piece? What is the intent of this key phrase based on PPC cost? And what is the competitiveness of this key phrase, based on what is the competition doing and how strong are those domains, along with just like, there was like a fourth variable, which is just like, how much we want to rank for it like that je no sais quoi component of a search term that like, we really liked that one, it really lines up with what we're doing this next month plots, release, and etc, etc. So all of those kinds of variables added up to a priority list for each category. That kind of was from 100, down to one. We did all of them. But how they were done in the order in which they were done was based on that kind of structure of analysing each one and determining which one was the clearest opportunity for them. So yeah, then they just kind of did it based on how many can Codeless be producing in a given month. We, as I said, we had a list of 850 within the year. And we did all of them, we did I think 500 or so in the first six months, and then 300 or so 350 or so in the next six. So yeah, it was fun. Takeaways there would categorise the content plan that you have, and then think up some level of prioritising which pieces need to go live first, around, this needs the most love from a link perspective, this needs the most love from like giving it the most, you know, the highest chance to be indexed, and also the highest chance for social media to engage with it and etc, etc, etc. So get those priority pieces up first, within each category that you want to produce content with him.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Appreciate it. Now it was you know, a very good and insightful answer. One question here would be, for example, when you're thinking about the domain authority, and what you like the tools that you had in the beginning when you started to produce this content, how much did this impact the performance of the new pages and the new content pieces that were published on the website? Did you start off having a very good domain authority or were there other link building activities happening in the background that we're helping you in certain areas as you mentioned, for example, prioritising the pages that need the most link love and then doing that for internal links and external?

 

James Scherer  

Yeah. So the short answer is that monday.com had existing domain authority or domain ranking on a trend of like 80. And on SEMrush of 75, something like that. So they were already in a very good place, which of course helps. And I'd love to talk about another client as well down the line, which is kind of on the other side of the coin for a lot of those customers who were like, well, this is all well and good, guys, but like, my domain authority is 35. And I don't have any budget. So how can those businesses succeed as well? But yeah, now monday.com, had existing domain authority, they also had an existing link building team. And then they also use so-called this works with our sister company, which is a backlinking agency, called User. And so a lot of our clients also use them because links are such an incredibly crucial part of content success. But determined, so that helped a lot. That said, all the best practices that we executed on top of that existing domain authority are just as valid for a small business as they are for monday.com. So creating search optimised content, using tools like MarketMuse, Phrase, Clearscope, whatever platform you want, if you're an early-stage business, I would recommend something like phrase, it's like a cheaper in and they do a lot good work, MarketMuse a bit more expensive. And also, there's a whole auditing thing, which is a bit more intense, but also a great tool.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Can we talk a bit about them, like, sorry, for interrupting your flow, but I think it's important for people that actually want to look at them to know, what does exactly each of them do. If we can talk people a bit through how to apply, you know, their, you know, add value.

 

James Scherer  

So all of those tools, the primary function for content creation is actually the optimization component. They do more. But for our purposes, they basically pull the SERP over the top 20 search results, actually for a targeted key phrase. So you want to write, you want to pick a piece of content for monday.com, targeting project management software. These tools will pull the top 20 search results for that key phrase, identify the headers within them, and the second symmetric key phrases that are associated with the content that's already ranking. So when you draft an article, it will compare what you've written to the ranking content. And say, you haven't touched on task management within your project management software tool, or fundamental software article. And all the competition content does. So as far as Google determining the comprehensiveness of your content you are lacking in that area. So add in that semantic key phrase and that subject matter and you will create a more comprehensive article that Google will reward just from the content itself perspective. What these tools don't do is a review, you know, the size of the page, the page experience, they can't see images, the quality or the or you know, that the wage or size of those images. And they actually don't do headers. So it can't see that. In your draft, you have an h2, which is optimised for search or not. It gives you the formatting really either the kind of can bold the text, which we know is like a very minute SEO variable, but there's something there, that kind of stuff that can't see either. It's just really around like the subject matter you've included in your pieces. So all of those tools can do that. All of them also, actually clear scope and phrase offer you the ability to like run that report, and then send it to a freelance writer or one of your internal writers and have the kind of fill in the draft. And it'll automatically see what you like how it's compared to the making content. And you pay usually based on the number of reports you pull in any given month. Agencies, of course, are on agency plans. And so we pull hundreds and hundreds and hundreds, hundreds, but that's all our systems work. And they also allow you to do content briefs to a certain extent based on again, the SERP. So what are the headers in the ranking content and you can pull in inspiration from that content into an outline that a writer can then fill out? So really handy tools I would recommend people mess around with those. If you're looking to do high volume content, or even just create search-oriented content, those tools can really be helpful.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Thank you for the insights. Now, back to your original flow, or idea if you remember it if not do because otherwise, I have the other question ready to go.

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, hit me with another question. I'm sure what I was saying is we'll come back out for sure.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Okay. The next question was really just like continuing the idea that you started which was okay, monday.com was a very big company. They were already starting off having a big presence and massive marketing budgets. What do you do if you don't? So if you don't have high domain authority, or if you don't have massive budgets or resources to invest into content marketing or SEO, how to go about, you know, in that case, and here, I was keen to hear your thoughts and example on, you know, the other client that you mentioned.

 

James Scherer  

Fantastic. Yeah. So this kind of brings up another client, Early bird, or get early bird.io, I think or earlybird.com, they are an early stage, financial investment app targeting parents, helping parents invest in their children's, like, financial future. So cool company, cool idea for a business. And again, when they came to us, they didn't have a blog. Talking about domain authority, they didn't have a blog. So we worked with them to build out, okay, how are we going to start building domain authority, creating great content to get it seen how we're going to link back to this content? And how we're going to get this site kind of momentum from an inbound perspective? And turn it into purposes, a lot of the stuff we do with monday.com is similar to what we do with Earlybird. So it's around okay, what are the categories of content we're going to target for this client, and what do they want to be seen for? In their case, it was kind of the idea of gifting money, gifting in general. And then like investment strategy, budgeting for young parents, and in more recent monthly been in the crypto space as well. So if those are the categories, we do a pillar and post structure, which I would recommend people do as well, based, again, on the categorization of content, targeting the highly competitive high volume search terms first getting them written and indexed. And then every article that you do in that category after the fact say, say you're doing 30 pieces of content per category over the course of a year over the course of eight months or whatever. Three to five of those within each category should be pillars, and then the remaining 25 or so should be support pieces that backlink internally to the pillar pieces of content. A pillar piece is just a kind of the more pressing more general or more like broad-spectrum subject within that category of content that has a higher search volume. And inevitably, a higher competitiveness a higher keyword difficulty. Again, all this data you can get from a trash or SEM rush for miles or whatever it is. And so we created their pillar pieces and then started driving backlinks to them from support content. They also did work with a backlinking company, again, the one that we work with quite a lot, User. I think they were on eight links per month plan, which essentially, if Ava's worked with any kind of backlinking agency or service, you know that a lot of them pay, you pay for the quality of the link that you're getting back. So I think they're playing was like 60, plus domain authority, publications and domains that would do a backlink directly to their content with the anchor text that we wanted to be found for. So over the course of that first 12 months with them, which was about November 2020, to Yeah, just a few months ago, they went from zero to 20,000. And they were doing eight articles a month. Which is I mean, compared to what monday.com was doing, that's you know, nothing, it's a couple a week. But target intentionally, linking intentionally, creating bottommost content with high-quality images, customs, like graphics that are branded and specific, no stock images, formatting from flow down the page, pulling people down the page, increasing time on page, reducing bounce rates, all of that stuff based on the formatting of the content itself. And then making sure that page experience was really good, which of course, is an incredibly important thing since the May June algorithm change, which means, you know, little JavaScript light pages, compressed images, you know, are tight and less than, whatever 200 megabytes or kilobytes, whatever. All those best practices kind of came to the fore with them. And another component of it is what I would say to readers is, ambition is all well and good, but momentum will get you farther. So if you're just starting out, starting from scratch with content production, I would say give yourself a bit of a broken target lower volume, lower kg pieces in order to get something live on your page and sorted to get stuff indexed or to get a few backlinks. And I mean, create the pillar content as well. But don't expect it to rank necessarily create it so that it's there and you can backlink to it, but then feel free to focus your attention on those lower acuity pieces and know that SEO is a long game. But once this was taken over, like with Earlybird, once they got some that momentum and the wheels really started rolling, we did start seeing, you know, 50% month on month growth, and then 75% month on growth, and then for like six months in the middle of everywhere, 100% month on month growth. But it took us four months or so to get to 1000 unique visitors per month, and then 1500, and then 3000, and then 10,000. And very quickly, it ticked over to the 20,000 space. And now we have to have a whole conversation about converting traffic. There's a whole different thing.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, for sure. And also until you know, all the new articles and content pieces are being indexed. And then they get the age that they need to in order to I mean, and also build upon their own authority and when there's not bouncing off the pages, and so on. So indeed, it's a bit of a longer game. So the sooner you start, and you do things right, the better and the sooner you'll see results. Yep, totally on point. And I'm vibing with you, this is exactly what I believe as well. Now, let's go a bit into the techy side of things. What's your experience with AI apply this to content, marketing, copywriting. There have been some tools out there.  What's your experience with this? Have you tried to use AI-powered content generation?

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, absolutely. I've tested a couple of different tools that produce content based on a key phrase that you plug in, Marketmuse has been like the main one that I've messed around with. But it's interesting. The other question is like, are the computers coming to take your job? And the answer is, from an SEO perspective, it depends on what vertical you're in. The financial space is becoming more and more dominated by AI. Yeah, written content, but content that is very much helped by AI. I think that those industries that are far more fact-based, just like especially with, you know, with financial words, like the this is the stock change over the course of the past day, and connecting that piece of data with another piece of data that AI can do, as long as you put in what it needs to pull from your fine. From the kind of thought leadership perspective, the idea that you know, you want to produce high-quality content that readers want to read and bring something new to the table. AI is never going to get there. The idea of novel thought is simply something that's not going to come from these tools. Does that mean that you cannot use AI to create higher quality content? No, it doesn't. It means that you can use these tools and they are effective. And then you have to go away by yourself in the darkroom and come up with something new and find an interesting and put your own voice into it, you know, your own ideas into it, and come up with something original. On top of what that AI has already helped you do. But that's also AI written content and AI-generated content. There's also a topic here around AI helping you create content. And the fact of the matter is that AI and software have been helping us create content for 15 years, I mean, Microsoft Word 96 had that little red line beneath a word that was misspelt. And when I fixed it, that was a piece of software identifying where you had messed up and telling you how to fix it. And that is AI helping you create content. Grammarly, which has been out for however long, helps people create content and write content effectively every day and has been doing so for years and no one's been intimidated by it. The fact of the matter is that a lot of these tools, I think the thing that people are scared by is the idea that content computers and AI will write your content for you and then everything will just be regurgitated. You know, a grey matter that doesn't actually do anything or add any value and also the original creators, their content writers will lose their jobs. And I think for me, we use a number of different tools, including Grammarly, including Hemingway app, we use plagiarism tracking tools like AutoCorrect and writer.com. We use again those content outline creation tools like Clearscope and Phrase, MarketMuse. We use optimization tools. And then we use software to make it all kind of come together with project management software that helps us identify when, when an article has included the number of, you know, key phrases we wanted to include and all the rest of it. And all of this comes together to alleviate the human error in content creation. Which is kind of scary for a lot of people. The fact that matter is that human error is also what makes content, original and real and human. But we all make spelling errors and grammatical errors that we know are wrong, but we can't see them because it's difficult to edit your own content. So I guess the long-short of it is that so long as you are open to creating higher quality content, AI can help you but don't be concerned that it's going to replace originality anytime soon. But there are a lot of tools out there that are trying.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, I agree with you, though. It's like, for example, with music and when you say like, for example, when you hear these perfect music, and but it just doesn't touch you as much as he does. You know, a live song with, you know, having the E string on a guitar a bit out of order, like a band on the guitar is a bit out of tune, but just enough, so it's real. It's not just like everything recording to perfection and fitting it all together, reproduced on a computer. So yeah, I mean,

 

James Scherer  

That's also there's also is that components of it, which is like, Okay, if AI can create a piece of content, why can't a writer then come in after the fact and like, tweak bits and pieces to make it sound real and whatever, whatever. And talking to it, we have 75 Odd freelancers on staff, and if we pulled them, every single one of them would rather write from scratch, than edit an AI-generated piece of content. And the reason for that is exactly what you say with like, when you hear something AI like, you know, made by computer written by computer music, especially. It sounds perfect, which is weird. And with AI, it sounds close to perfect. But there's no written content that sounds close to perfect, but there's just something slightly off about it, and you're not 100% Sure what and it takes you five minutes of the element to figure out what it is. That's weird in that phraseology, or in that grammar, or in that syntax and structure. Any writer would prefer just to write the damn paragraph themselves, rather than having to find what's weird about it, cuz there's something that just sounds odd to my ear, and I don't know what it is. And then yeah, you explode.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, I can imagine having to go through, you know, like a normal 2000 words piece of content, doing that every day and then trying to figure out what's wrong every two seconds sentences and try to rephrase that. I think it drives you crazy. So you know,

 

James Scherer  

I just want to say just right.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah. Cool. So yeah,  I'm aligned with you on this one. And, you know, as you mentioned, I think it can sound overwhelming for somebody that has to do you know, content writing or production, for example, for the guys tuning in, that maybe are managing the marketing, but also producing the marketing or they are one band, one band kind of team or two people in on the marketing team, it can sound overwhelming. But again, there are some simple tools that can help accelerate or you know, just take some of the mistakes out. So for example, using a tool that helps you see how good your content is for your desired purpose, as opposed to what's already ranking, as you mentioned, or eliminating the grammar spelling mistakes. These are tools that are accessible, easy to use, and can certainly contribute to producing more quality content, potentially at scale,

 

James Scherer  

100% per cent. Nothing to add there, you are absolutely right.

 

Andrei Tiu  

So how do you see things going forward in 2022? We now robots will not take copywriters out. But what else do you see working well these days? Or what are you guys experimenting with? Where do you feel marketers should focus their attention towards?

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, so what we're doing now we're changing our strategy in 2022, for all of our clients revolves around two primary algorithm updates that came out last year. The first of those was back in January, February. This wasn't a major algorithm release, but a lot of businesses saw the effects of whatever they did. And essentially, a lot of our kind of affiliate clients who were publishing 5000+ word articles, the massive massive listicles saw significant ranking decreases overnight, pretty much. And it looks to be that Google was cracking down on those massively comprehensive guides, which a lot of businesses have been using for a long time to like Okay, well, if I don't have the domain authority to rank for this key phrase, and the article that's already there is good is already on the first page is good, I'm just gonna write something that's like 10 times longer in order to, to rank. And it worked for a while. Because, you know, if we're talking about semantic key phrases included in each piece, and when you have 150 of them. And a lot of people would, you know, link to those because they were comprehensive in scope. Google's cracking down on those because the fact of the matter is, is that the user experience, the leader experience was pretty poor, navigating those his own extra impossible. And so that was a that was the thing that we're addressing. We create your speciality long-form, high-quality content, that's what we do. That's our selling proposition, what is long-form in 2022? In general, I have not scoped out a piece of content that needs to be more than 2500 words in about six months. Because pretty much every subject realistically can be covered in that word count. And if not, you should write another article on the related subject matter, and then link to the original pillar piece. So that's the first one go a little bit shorter. And then kind of tied into that is focusing on paid experience, which again, that was the May, June paid experience algorithm update, which is all about streamlining your pages and your site in general, focusing on reducing the amount of code and the back end, focusing on, high-quality images that are compressed PNG file types that like, look really good, but aren't massive. The idea of when you go into Google Search Console, you should have no errors that talk about heavy pages or, or red flags around like these pages, whatever megabytes, when it gets crawled. And that ties really well into the like: if we're doing shorter form content of you know, 1215 to 2500, then there's no reason that those pages should be massive. And the pages that were massive, and I think this is probably realistic, is that in February, when that initial algorithm, we saw the results of that algorithm that was Google, like pushing out preliminary changes to the algorithm that would tonne of them come in in fall in the page algorithm, the paid experience update in major. So for all those guests like that, what this means is that your content needs to be tight, beautiful, the page experience needs to be a really good name, there needs to be clear interlinking between all content. Again, based on the category of content, you should be tagging within those categories. And there's no reason to go over 500 words on a piece, focus on creating high-quality content that's well linked internally and then driving backlinks externally. Again, I'm not saying anything, that hasn't been true for years, I think that I mean, people used to write long-form articles, and they get really long from articles and used to work. But what I'm saying is that everything that we like has been a best practice is just can't be messed around with anymore. Like there's no possibility of winning if you're creating 10,000-word articles that are poorly linked extremely heavy, it just doesn't happen anymore. So focus on those few things. And you should be okay, in 2022, nothing crazy, nothing. Mostly, Google will probably throw something at us, and then we'll have to scramble to fix it. But that's my expectation.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Yeah, and in other words, sort of what you also said is that, you know, we have video and all these other content formats, but in the end, the value of the written content stays there. And sticking to these best practices, and to the way that Google wants content to be produced by humans, is still going to be driving a massive amount of value to brands that are using this marketing channel, right?

 

James Scherer  

And video is ...even saying the video is the next big thing. I wrote an article in 2014 talking about how the video was the next big thing and that was my like, anticipation for 2014. And it's we've never been wrong. But for a lot of people really high-quality video is out of the realm of their marketing budget. Because it needs to be really well produced. The audio needs to be fantastic. The video quality needs to be fantastic, it needs to be edited really well. And it needs to be cut up into a bunch of different clips that go on YouTube and whatever, whatever it is being hosted by the right place. And those hosting sites can be expensive. So I'm not saying don't do video, in fact, I'm saying you should do video. However, if you don't have the marketing budget to invest in video, don't invest a little In the video, don't do bad video, because the bad video is worse than no video at all. And you can get a lot more bang for your buck with high-quality content that is evergreen and targets highballing key phrases and ranks for a good long time.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Great. James, we're getting close to the end of the episode together. But this was a very, very cool chat. Really loved the energy. Where can people find you? How can people come to you to help with or connect and discuss things?

 

James Scherer  

Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think the easiest way to get in touch would be I'm on Twitter @jdscherer if you want to message me or anything like that. From a production perspective, head over to codeless.io and book a call with us. We kind of do consultations first and foremost because we care as much about identifying if the client is right for us as if we're right for them. So we usually do kind of an in-depth idea, like the discussion around like, what are you doing? What's not working? Why are you even like looking for anybody and then we can help direct businesses to other types of agencies or if we're right for them, then that's great. But if people are interested in doing content production, get in touch.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Super. James, thank you so much for being on the show today! This was a great chat. This is likely to be the most comprehensive video for this season covering this subject. So really happy that we had the chance to discuss this subject together. Meanwhile, guys, go over to codeless.io, check out what they do, connect with James on Twitter, on LinkedIn, you'll have the links to the tools that we were discussing about as well as to the platforms in the description of the episode or on social media if you watch this there or YouTube in the description as well. And until next time, thank you, as always for tuning in. If you have any feedback or anything that you'd like us to discuss in more depth, feel free to ping us at hello@marketiu.com or James. And James, if you're offering we can organise another episode, later on, to see if there's anything relevant to the audience that we haven't covered today.

 

James Scherer  

I'd love that, that would be great. Get in touch.

 

Andrei Tiu  

Super. So yeah, until next time, thank you everyone for being on the show. James Thank you again, wishing you an amazing year ahead because we are seeing the beginning. All the best of success and I'm looking forward to catching up soon. 

 

Share | Download(Loading)